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CREATION ART

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    Saturday, December 01, 2007

     

    Algerian Desert Rose

    IMG_2670 shellsandrocks
    Algeria Desert rose sandstone Collected in the desert near Ghardia
    Natural sculptures in the desert
    >>>
    Desert Rose is the colloquial name given to rosette formations of the minerals gypsum and barite with sand inclusions.

    Gypsum is a very soft mineral composed of calcium sulfate dihydrate, with the chemical formula CaSO4·2H2O
    Barite (BaSO4) is a mineral consisting of barium sulfate. This mineral is white or colorless and is the main source of barium. Baryte is the British spelling.

    In mineralogy, an inclusion is any material that is trapped inside a mineral during its formation.

    Inclusions are usually other minerals or rocks, but may also be water, gasses or petroleum. In the case of amber it is possible to find insects and plants as inclusions.

    Jurgen- i look this up - visit this web ad if you want to know more about it
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desert_rose

    Desert rose (crystal)

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    Saharan desert rose, 10 cm long.
    Saharan desert rose, 10 cm long.

    Desert rose is the colloquial name given to rosette formations of the minerals gypsum and barite with poikilotopic sand inclusions. The 'petals' are crystals flattened on the c crystallographic axis, fanning open along characteristic gypsum cleavage planes. (See also: Crystallography)

    The rosette crystal habit tends to occur when the crystals form in arid sandy conditions, such as the evaporation of a shallow salt basin. Gypsum roses usually have better defined, sharper edges than barite roses.

    The desert rose may also be known by the names:

    Pictures of desert roses from Büdingen, Hesse, Germany


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